Get Out (2017) Film Mini Review

Get Out is an American horror suspense film that is directed by actor Jordan Peele in his directorial debut. It is a film about racism, sort of, that has struck a note nowadays, especially for Black Lives Matter movement, and stars Daniel Kaluuya and Allison Williams. With the film featuring an interracial couple, and this being the director’s first film, is Get Out gonna be a gem or a thrash? Let’s delve deeper below!

The basic premise is regarding an interracial couple, Chris and Rose, who are preparing to go meet the latter’s parents in some small town. He feels uneasy when he realises Rose does not tell her parents about his race. Then, as they meet the parents and some black servants, Chris starts to feel that something is amiss. Rose’s mother also begins to use a sort of hypnotism to help with his smoking habit, but things start to take a weird turn. Will Chris ever be able to get himself out of the strange events before its too late?

It is an interesting take on the horror genre with racism being a part of the bigger theme. The narrative is pretty unique and I quite like the quirkiness of the turns of events. Though, it does feel a bit like a story from a ‘B-movie’. The pacing is fast, with the protagonist immediately setting foot on the town within ten minutes and there are not many unnecessary scenes. It has a pretty impactful scene early in the beginning that sets the motion of turning it from a rom-com to horror. Characters wise, they are cast well, with Daniel playing Chris convincingly as a black man gotten used to racism. The other characters have some personalities as well, and not entirely one-sided, especially with Rose’s family members.

The sound design is superb, where it makes good use of both silence and creepy soundtracks that are combined with natural ambiance sound. Some of the music tracks have those creepy choir voices which make some scenes exceptionally suspenseful. The film also manages to balance itself between horror and comedy, with some comedic scenes in the middle portions that serve as a break in the tension. I would say the racism theme is made pretty obvious and would love it to be more subtle. Truthfully, the ending has a pretty expectable twist, which can be a bit disappointing as the film turns into B-movie like.

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Categories: Blockbusters, Film Review, Movie ReviewTags: , , , , , , , ,

Anthony L Tjandra

A photographer and videographer that aims to capture the Heart behind the moments.

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